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Truck Freight
 
Definition
Trucking Terminology:

18 wheeler
3PL
agent
available truckloads
b-train
backhaul
big truck
broker
brokerage
bulk
bulk carrier
bulk freight
cargo
cargo carrier
carrier
cartage
cdl
cdl test
Central Refridgerated
common carrier
Contract Carrier
credit reports
deadhead
delivery
delivery service
direct drive
Direct shipper
dispatch
Dispatcher
distribution
driver
Driver log
driving
driving careers
Driving direction
driving jobs
dry box
dry van
Edge truckers
eflatbed
end dump
end dump trailer
equipment
expedite
expedited
expedited trucking
factoring
fast cash
find a truck
find freight
find loads
flat
flatbed
flatbed freight
flatbed trucking
fleet
Flying J
forwarder
forwarding
free postings
freeloads
freight
freight broker
freight carrier
freight company
freight find
freight finder
freight forwarder
freight forwarders
freight forwarding
freight line
freight matching
freight matching services
freighter
freighting
Fuel Optimization
Fuel Tax
get loaded
haul
haulage
hauling
heavy haul
hopper
Hotshot
IFS
independent truck driver
Intermediary
intermodal
Internet truckstop
just in time
Lading Bill
less than a truck load
less than truckload
live floor trailer
load
load board
load match
load matching
load planning
loadboard
loading dock
loads
loads online
Logistics
long haul
ltl
matching
mileage
online freight
operator
OTR
Over the road trucking
owner
owner operator
owner operator truck driver
pick ups
pigg back
piggy-back
post
post loads
private fleet
quote
reefer
reefers sale
refridgerated
refrigerated
refrigerated truck
road conditions
roadlink
route
searching
semi
semi trailer
semi truck
sending
service logistics
ship
shipment
shipper
shipping
short haul
specialty equipment
speedway
Supply Chain
Supply Chain management
tanker
temperature controlled
third party logistics
ton
tracing
tracking
tractor
traffic
Traffic management
Traffic manager
trailer
transport
transportation
Transportation Directory
truck
truck company
truck driver
truck driving career
Truck Driving Job
Truck Driving School
truck freight
Truck loads
trucker
trucker news
trucker edge
truckin
trucking
Trucking Broker
trucking co
trucking company
trucking freight
trucking industry
trucking links
truckload
truckload rate truckload
trucks loads
truckstop
Van
Vehicle
warehouse links
warehouse logistics
warehousing
Trucking Terminology:

18 wheeler
3PL
agent
available truckloads
b-train
backhaul
big truck
broker
brokerage
bulk
bulk carrier
bulk freight
cargo
cargo carrier
carrier
cartage
cdl
cdl test
Central Refridgerated
common carrier
Contract Carrier
credit reports
deadhead
delivery
delivery service
direct drive
Direct shipper
dispatch
Dispatcher
distribution
driver
Driver log
driving
driving careers
Driving direction
driving jobs
dry box
dry van
Edge truckers
eflatbed
end dump
end dump trailer
equipment
expedite
expedited
expedited trucking
factoring
fast cash
find a truck
find freight
find loads
flat
flatbed
flatbed freight
flatbed trucking
fleet
Flying J
forwarder
forwarding
free postings
freeloads
freight
freight broker
freight carrier
freight company
freight find
freight finder
freight forwarder
freight forwarders
freight forwarding
freight line
freight matching
freight matching services
freighter
freighting
Fuel Optimization
Fuel Tax
get loaded
haul
haulage
hauling
heavy haul
hopper
Hotshot
IFS
independent truck driver
Intermediary
intermodal
Internet truckstop
just in time
Lading Bill
less than a truck load
less than truckload
live floor trailer
load
load board
load match
load matching
load planning
loadboard
loading dock
loads
loads online
Logistics
long haul
ltl
matching
mileage
online freight
operator
OTR
Over the road trucking
owner
owner operator
owner operator truck driver
pick ups
pigg back
piggy-back
post
post loads
private fleet
quote
reefer
reefers sale
refridgerated
refrigerated
refrigerated truck
road conditions
roadlink
route
searching
semi
semi trailer
semi truck
sending
service logistics
ship
shipment
shipper
shipping
short haul
specialty equipment
speedway
Supply Chain
Supply Chain management
tanker
temperature controlled
third party logistics
ton
tracing
tracking
tractor
traffic
Traffic management
Traffic manager
trailer
transport
transportation
Transportation Directory
truck
truck company
truck driver
truck driving career
Truck Driving Job
Truck Driving School
truck freight
Truck loads
trucker
trucker news
trucker edge
truckin
trucking
Trucking Broker
trucking co
trucking company
trucking freight
trucking industry
trucking links
truckload
truckload rate truckload
trucks loads
truckstop
Van
Vehicle
warehouse links
warehouse logistics
warehousing
 

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ship

1. Pay; reward.
In withholding or abridging of the ship or the hire or the wages of servants.
- Chaucer.
1. Any large seagoing vessel.
Like a stately ship . . .
With all her bravery on, and tackle trim,
Sails filled, and streamers waving.
- Milton.
Thou, too, sail on, O Ship of State!
- Longfellow.
2. Specifically, a vessel furnished with a bowsprit and three masts (a mainmast, a foremast, and a mizzenmast), each of which is composed of a lower mast, a topmast, and a topgallant mast, and square-rigged on all masts. See Illustation in Appendix.
3. A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense.Armed ship
a private ship taken into the service of the government in time of war, and armed and equipped like a ship of war.
General ship
See under General.
- Brande & C.
Ship biscuit
hard biscuit prepared for use on shipboard; - called also ship bread. See Hardtack.
Ship boy
a boy who serves in a ship.
Ship breaker
one who breaks up vessels when unfit for further use.
- Shak.
Ship broker
a mercantile agent employed in buying and selling ships, procuring cargoes, etc., and generally in transacting the business of a ship or ships when in port.
Ship canal
a canal suitable for the passage of seagoing vessels.
Ship carpenter
a carpenter who works at shipbuilding; a shipwright.
Ship chandler
one who deals in cordage, canvas, and other, furniture of vessels.
Ship chandlery
the commodities in which a ship chandler deals; also, the business of a ship chandler.
Ship fever
(Med.) a form of typhus fever; - called also putrid fever, jail fever, or hospital fever.
Ship joiner
a joiner who works upon ships.
Ship letter
a letter conveyed by a ship not a mail packet.
Ship money
(Eng. Hist.) an imposition formerly charged on the ports, towns, cities, boroughs, and counties, of England, for providing and furnishing certain ships for the king's service. The attempt made by Charles I. to revive and enforce this tax was resisted by John Hampden, and was one of the causes which led to the death of Charles. It was finally abolished.
Ship of the line
See under Line.
Ship pendulum
a pendulum hung amidships to show the extent of the rolling and pitching of a vessel.
Ship railway
a - An inclined railway with a cradelike car, by means of which a ship may be drawn out of water, as for repairs
b - A railway arranged for the transportation of vessels overland between two water courses or harbors.
Ship's company
the crew of a ship or other vessel.
Ship's days
the days allowed a vessel for loading or unloading.
Ship's husband
See under Husband.
Ship's papers
(Mar. Law) papers with which a vessel is required by law to be provided, and the production of which may be required on certain occasions. Among these papers are the register, passport or sea letter, charter party, bills of lading, invoice, log book, muster roll, bill of health, etc.
To make ship
to embark in a ship or other vessel.
- Bouvier.

v. t. 1. To put on board of a ship, or vessel of any kind, for transportation; to send by water.
[imp. & p. p. Shipped ; p. pr. & vb. n. Shipping.]
The timber was . . . shipped in the bay of Attalia, from whence it was by sea transported to Pelusium.
- Knolles.
2. By extension, in commercial usage, to commit to any conveyance for transportation to a distance; as, to ship freight by railroad.
3. Hence, to send away; to get rid of.
4. To engage or secure for service on board of a ship; as, to ship seamen.
5. To receive on board ship; as, to ship a sea.
6. To put in its place; as, to ship the tiller or rudder.
v. i. 1. To engage to serve on board of a vessel; as, to ship on a man-of-war.
2. To embark on a ship.


Noun 1. ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
Verb 1. ship - transport commercially
Synonyms: send, transport
2. ship - hire for work on a ship
3. ship - go on board
Synonyms: embark
4. ship - travel by ship
5. ship - place on board a ship; "ship the cargo in the hold of the vessel"


SHIP. This word, in its most enlarged sense, signifies a vessel employed in navigation; for example, the terms the ship's papers, the ship's husband, shipwreck, and the like, are employed whether the vessel referred to be a brig, a sloop, or a three-masted vessel.
2. In a more confined sense, it means such a vessel with three masts 4 Wash. C. C. Rep. 530; Wesk. Inst. h.t. p. 514 the boats and rigging; 2 Marsh. Ins. 727 together with the anchors, masts, cables, pullies, and such like objects, are considered as part of the ship. Pard. n. 599; Dig. 22, 2, 44.
3. The capacity of a ship is ascertained by its tonnage, or the space which may be occupied by its cargo. Vide Story's Laws U. S. Index, h.t.; Gordon's Dig. h.t.; Abbott on Ship. Index, h.t.; Park. Ins. Index, h.t.; Phil. Ev. Index, h.t. Bac. Ab. Merchant, N; 3 Kent, Com. 93 Molloy, Jure Mar. Index, h.t.; l Chit. Pr. 91; Whart. Dig. h.t.; 1 Bell's Com. 496, 624; and see General Ships; Names of Ships.


To see a ship in your dream, denotes that you are exploring aspects of your emotions and unconscious mind. The state and condition of the ship is indicative of your emotional state. If it is a cruise ship, then it suggests pleasant moods. If it is a warship, then you are experiencing feelings of aggression. To dream that you are sailing the high seas in a ship, denotes that you are standing tall in times emotional turmoil.

A ship, like a boat, is a vehicle designed for passage or transportation across water. It is usually large enough to carry its own boats, such as lifeboats, dinghies, or runabouts. A rule of thumb saying (though it doesn't always apply) is "a boat can fit on a ship, but a ship can't fit on a boat". The exact size at which a ship becomes a boat is often defined by local law and regulation. Submarines are always called boats.
During the age of sail, ship signified a ship-rigged vessel, that is, one with three square-rigged masts and a bowsprit.

Nautical means related to ships, particularly customs and practices at sea.

Types of ships in use Cruise ship
Ocean liner
Tanker
Auto carrier
Container ship
Ferry
Reefer (refrigerated ship)
RO-RO ship (roll on, roll off)
Sailing ship
tug
cargo ship
tender
Icebreaker
Catamaran

Historical types of ships Bilander
Caravel
Carrack
Clipper
Frigate
Galleon
Galley
Knarr
Liberty ship
Longship
Man of war
Q-ship
Steamship
Ship of the line
Trireme
Victory ship

How ships are measured Ships are measured in terms of overall length, length along the waterline, beam (breadth) and tonnage. There are a number of different tonnage definitions, the majority of which are measures of volume rather than displacement. Displacement is most frequently applied to naval vessels and is equal to the actual weight of a ship under specific conditions. "Light ship" tonnage is the actual weight of the ship with no fuel, no persons, no cargo, no water on board, just as it first entered the water. The term "displacement" is used because of the basic physical law, discovered by Archimedes, that the weight of a floating object is exactly that of the weight of the water that would otherwise be in the "hole in the water" created by the ship.

In England, up until the end of the 19th century, ships could be loaded until their decks were almost awash, resulting in a dangerously unstable condition. Additionally, anyone who signed onto the ship for a voyage and, upon realizing that there was danger, chose to leave the ship, could be jailed.

Samuel Plimsoll, a member of Parliament, realized the problem and engaged some engineers to derive a fairly simple formula to determine the position of a line on the side of any specific ship's hull which, when it reached the surface of the water during loading of cargo, meant the ship was as deeply laden as it could safely be. To this day, that mark exists on ships' sides, is called the "Plimsoll Mark", and is a circle with a horizontal line through the center. Because different types of water, (summer, fresh, tropical fresh, winter north Atlantic) have different densities, it became required that a group of lines forward of the Plimsoll Mark be installed to indicate the safe depth (or freeboard above the surface) to which a specific ship could be loaded in water of various densities. That is the "ladder" of lines seen forward of the Plimsoll Mark to this day.

The front of a ship is called the bow, and the rear is the stern. The side of the ship which is on the right when the observer is facing forward is called starboard; the left side is called port. (An easy way to remember port and starboard is that left and port both have four letters.) Different levels of a ship are called decks.

"Walls" in a ship are called "bulkheads". Many are structural members, as well. They serve to maintain stability, prevent water from flooding the entire ship in the event of a breach of the hull, and contain fire. Many are fitted with watertight doors which, in the case of certain types of ships, may be remotely closed.


PropulsionUntil the application of the steam engine to ships in the early 19th century, vessels were either galleys propelled by oars or sailing ships propelled by the wind.
Merchant ships were always sailing vessels, but as long as naval warfare depended on ships closing to ram or to fight hand-to-hand, galleys were dominant in war because of their maneuverability and speed. The Greek warships that fought in the Peloponnesian War were triremes, as were the Roman warships that contested the Battle of Actium. The use of large numbers of cannon from the 16th century meant that maneuverability was less important than broadside weight; this led to the dominance of the sail-powered warship.

The development of the steamship was complex, the first commercial success being Robert Fulton's North River Steamboat (often called the "Clermont") in the USA followed in Europe by the 45-foot PS Comet of 1812. Steam propulsion progressed considerably over the rest of the 19th century. Notable developments included the condenser, which reduced the requirement for fresh water, and the multiple expansion engine, which improved efficiency. Further efficiencies resulted from the development of the marine steam turbine by Sir Charles Parsons, who demonstrated it on the 100-foot Turbinia at the Spithead Naval Review in 1897. This facilitated a generation of high-speed liners in the first half of the 20th century.

The marine diesel was first used around 1912, either the Vulcanus or the Selandia depending upon who you talk to. It soon offered even greater efficiency than the steam turbine but, for many years, an inferior power to space ratio. Most ships built since around 1960 have been diesel powered, or motor ships, one exception being the Queen Elizabeth 2 of 1968, which was fitted with steam turbines (although she was subsequently converted to diesel as a cost saving measure).

A few ships have been powered by nuclear reactors, but this form of propulsion has caused concerns about safety and has only been popular in large aircraft carriers and in submarines, where the ability to run submerged for long periods has obvious benefits.


Ships in the Bible

Early used in foreign commerce by the Phoenicians (Gen. 49:13). Moses (Deut. 28:68) and Job (9:26) make reference to them, and Balaam speaks of the "ships of Chittim" (Num. 24:24). Solomon constructed a navy at Ezion-geber by the assistance of Hiram's sailors (1 Kings 9:26-28; 2 Chr. 8:18). Afterwards, Jehoshaphat sought to provide himself with a navy at the same port, but his ships appear to have been wrecked before they set sail (1 Kings 22:48, 49; 2 Chr. 20:35-37).

In Jesus' time fishermen's boats on the Sea of Galilee were called "ships." Much may be learned regarding the construction of ancient merchant ships and navigation from the record in Acts 27, 28.


See alsoairship
captain
concrete ship
dynamic positioning
ghost ship
hospital ship
international law
International Maritime Organization
knarr
longship
maritime law
ship model
naval ship
sailing
seamanship
ship-building
ship model basin
ship transport
spaceship
steamboat
transport
List of civilian nuclear ships
List of fictional ships
For a list of the prefixes used with ship names (HMS, USS, &c.) see ship prefix.

Quotes I must go down to the sea again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship, and a star to steer her by... -John Masefield


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